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πŸ”₯+ webmd blood sugar levels chart 04 Jun 2020 People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. At first, your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into your cells. But eventually, it can't keep up, and the glucose builds up in your blood instead. Usually, a combination of things causes type 2 diabetes.What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, once called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 90% to 95% of the ...

webmd blood sugar levels chart When you do not have enough insulin or you have trouble using the insulin your body makes, sugar builds up in your blood and cannot get into your cells. The 2 ...

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Living with Diabetes


Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind --  food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act.

We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI''s brochure "" in English or "" in Spanish

Caring for Older People with Diabetes

Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications.

The Diabetes Research Institute has prepared a brochure that provides useful tips to help you manage the diabetes of an older person. Read "" in English or "" in Spanish.

Checking Blood Sugar

Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "" -- levels because they do not want for 1 last update 04 Jun 2020 to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range.Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range.

But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes.

Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not.

Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels are above or below your target range, blood glucose monitoring provides you with the ability to identify what is causing the problem and to correct it.

To learn the basics about checking blood sugar, read the DRI''s brochure ""https://www.diabetesresearch.org/file/living-with-diabetes/Diabetes-at-School.pdf""_blank""noopener"" or download this eight-page guide to provide to your child''s brochure "" in English, "" or "" in Spanish.

Explaining Diabetes to Kids

Did you know that insulin works like a key to a door?

Insulin opens the doors to the cells of our body. When the doors swing open, the sugar in our bloodstream enter our cells, and our body uses that sugar for energy.

This is an example of one way to explain diabetes to kids.

For other helpful tips, plus educational word games, read the DRI''s brochure "" in English  or "" in Spanish.

Insulin Therapy

People with type 1 diabetes, and some people with type 2 diabetes, need to replace the insulin that they are unable to produce, to maintain normal body functions.

Insulin is given by subcutaneous injection, using a syringe, pen device, or may be delivered via an insulin pump.

To learn more about such topics as

• "" and
• ""

Read the DRI''s brochure "" in English or "" in Spanish.

Blood Glucose Monitoring Tools

Q: With the tools available now to monitor blood sugar that help to keep numbers as normal as possible, is there more potential for hypoglycemic reactions?

A:  Most people with diabetes strive to achieve blood glucose levels within a specified target range that’s closest to normal physiologic levels.  In my experience, too many people have set unrealistic, low targets, believing lower (often too low) is better because of fear of complications from high blood glucose levels.
 
Unfortunately, this mind set of low is better, can often lead to overtreatment and frequent hypoglycemia, which must be avoided if we want to help preserve hypoglycemia signs and symptoms. Glucose monitoring tools have the ability to both help and hinder.

The three tools that determine the level of glucose control are a blood glucose meter, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test result and a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Looking at these tools collectively will provide you and your healthcare team with the most complete glucose picture.

A blood glucose meter provides the most accurate (excluding user error) real-time blood glucose level by providing you with an immediate capillary glucose result. It is this capillary result that we ask you to use for insulin for 1 last update 04 Jun 2020 determination in hyperglycemia and treatment with glucose for hypoglycemia. We generally recommend 4-6 blood glucose checks per day to optimize control, providing 4-6 photo snapshots of the blood glucose levels. Even with this incredible commitment to self-management, information regarding blood glucose levels between these readings is unknown.A blood glucose meter provides the most accurate (excluding user error) real-time blood glucose level by providing you with an immediate capillary glucose result. It is this capillary result that we ask you to use for insulin determination in hyperglycemia and treatment with glucose for hypoglycemia. We generally recommend 4-6 blood glucose checks per day to optimize control, providing 4-6 photo snapshots of the blood glucose levels. Even with this incredible commitment to self-management, information regarding blood glucose levels between these readings is unknown.

The elusive 6-7 percent HbA1c is, for me, an over-rated determinant of glucose control. Your 3 monthly HbA1c result provides you with an average of your glucose control over the previous 2-3 months. Many people strive for years to obtain the elusive 6-7 percent HbA1c result, only to find when they do achieve it, the healthcare team may still want more.

To explain my point, in a recent Mastering Your Diabetes Program, those participants who did have their HbA1c under 7 percent, demonstrated the greatest swings in blood glucose levels from hypoglycemia to hyperglycemia.   Remember, an average blood glucose level of 120mg/dL (the midpoint of 80-160mg/dL), would equate with an HbA1c result of 6 percent and who wouldn’t be happy with that – right? But you can also achieve the same HbA1c with blood glucose levels ranging from 30-210mg/dL – riding the diabetes rollercoaster. An HbA1c result must be assessed in conjunction with capillary and / or CGM data to identify its true value. 

Our third tool, CGM, in essence, provides a DVD of the individual’s glucose control. Although invaluable in providing data regarding glucose trends, CGM can lead to reactive management when you are receiving up to 288 glucose readings every 24 hours – information overload! Hypoglycemia, from over-correction, is a significant education point. We must remember that because CGM measures interstitial fluid glucose levels, there can be up to a 20 percent variability compared to capillary glucose readings and sometimes more when the glucose level is changing rapidly. Confirmation of data with a capillary reading is essential for accuracy and takes priority.

In essence, each glucose-monitoring tool has value, but true value comes from collective review.

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The word "" means "" Hypoglycemia means having a low blood sugar. It can occur in people who take medication to treat their diabetes. But hypoglycemia is usually avoidable.

It''s brochure "" in English or "" in Spanish.

Meal Planning and Kids''s brochure "" in English, "" or "" in Spanish.

Preventing Diabetes Complications

Diabetes can affect all of the blood vessels in the body, and can cause potential harm to your eyes, heart, kidneys, nerves, other organs and body parts.

But these diabetes complications are not an inevitable part of living with diabetes.

There is a lot you can do to stay well and remain healthy with diabetes. 

To learn how to take a "" approach to diabetes, and to help prevent diabetes complications, read the DRI''s brochure "" in English or "" in Spanish.

Setting Goals

Diabetes can impact all aspects of life. And, all aspects of life can impact diabetes.

webmd blood sugar levels chart food plan (β˜‘ immune system) | webmd blood sugar levels chart vitamin dhow to webmd blood sugar levels chart for With all the challenges of managing diabetes, it can be difficult for people living with disease to for 1 last update 04 Jun 2020 stay on track.With all the challenges of managing diabetes, it can be difficult for people living with disease to stay on track.

Setting goals can help you to achieve this -- goals for things like eating, exercise, checking blood sugar, reducing stress, etc.

To begin managing your diabetes more effectively by setting goals, read the DRI''re sick, managing diabetes becomes even more difficult.

Illness can cause your blood sugar levels to rise, and lead to a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis.

You can prevent this from happening.

To learn how to manage diabetes sick days, read the DRI''s Safety at School

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1. Educate yourself and your child. Knowledge is an important key to managing diabetes.

2. Talk to all relevant school personnel. Start with the principal and school teachers, all the way through to the bus driver. Share important information regarding the progress of your child''t only ensure that all the necessary tools are available to your child; know that they''s No. 1 advocate. Know your legal rights - be patient but diligent. The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, American Diabetes Association, National Diabetes Education Program and other organizations and websites are invaluable resources to parents.

A Multilevel Approach

As school enrollments grow, so do the health care needs of children in schools. Unfortunately, there has not been equivalent increase in the supply of school nurses, and in fact, many schools operate without full-time school nurses largely due to budgetary restraints. Individual attention to students is often not possible. Clearly, diabetes management in school requires a multilevel approach.

Even if your child has access to a full-time school nurse, the 24/7 nature of diabetes requires that your child and all of his/her caregivers are ready to respond to routine or emergency care needs - eg., field trips, athletic/sporting events, bus rides to and from home, etc. Open and frequent communication between the child, parents and school personnel is essential to the child's success - scholastically, socially and in terms of his/her diabetes management outcomes.

There are sederal and state laws to help protect students with diabetes. It is important to compare federal and state requirements for:

• Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA
• Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 197
• Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA
• Family and Medical Leave Ac
• Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

It is absolutely essential that parents be aware of the child and their federal and state legal rights. Essentially, the school cannot discriminate against a child with diabetes (disability) and is required to make reasonable changes in its practices and policies to avoid discrimination - to allow children to participate with equal opportunity unless doing so poses ""

Public schools prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability regardless of whether they receive federal funds. Private entities receiving federal funding may not exclude a child with diabetes if the school can make minor amendments to provide the 1 last update 04 Jun 2020 an appropriate education. Private, nonreligious schools are covered by Title III of the ADA.

Public schools prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability regardless of whether they receive federal funds. Private entities receiving federal funding may not exclude a child with diabetes if the school can make minor amendments to provide an appropriate education. Private, nonreligious schools are covered by Title III of the ADA.

Insulin Therapy Tips

 1.   Know the actions of your insulin(s)
Knowing the onset of action, the peak action and duration of action of the insulin(s) that you use to treat your diabetes will help you to know when and how to use your insulin(s) to optimize your blood glucose control. Many people for instance are tempted to correct a high blood glucose level two hours after eating, not considering that the rapid acting insulin they are using (Apidra, Humalog or Novolog) lasts for typically four hours – this can lead to possible overcorrection of the blood glucose level and hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). Know your insulin actions to take the right action! 

2.   Site rotation of insulin injections is essential
A key element to insulin effectiveness relates to the site in which insulin is injected. Many people with diabetes have ‘favorite’ sites to give their injections or place their pump catheters, often leading to over-use of the site. Over-use of an injection or pump site can lead to the development of hardened areas which can significantly affect the way the insulin is absorbed from the area. Erratic blood glucose levels can result. Also, there is the possibility for infection and / or abscess formation. So let’s get the best from your insulin injection / pump site and rotate sites widely.  Areas for injection include the back of the upper arm, abdomen, outer thigh and upper-outer buttock / hip region.  Be an equal opportunist! 

3.   Use the insulin delivery tool that best suits your lifestyle
Insulin therapy is essential for life in Type 1 diabetes. Currently available insulin delivery tools consist of syringes, insulin pens and insulin pumps. The choice of insulin delivery tool is very individualized and should (excluding young children) be left to the individual living with diabetes to decide. There have been many times when the insulin delivery tool being used by the individual has been a significant factor in poor diabetes control – wrong tool for the wrong person. It is essential that all people living with diabetes receive optimal education about all the choices of insulin delivery tools that are available, so that they can make an informed and educated decision. Remember to get updated at least annually because technology is changing very rapidly regarding insulin delivery and blood glucose monitoring devices.  Keeping informed keeps you ahead!

4.   Correct basal insulin delivery should lead to the greatest flexibility in meal plans
Before the availability of our current injected basal insulins of Lantus and Levemir or if using an insulin pump, typically Apidra, Humalog or Novolog, the insulin choices we had did not provide true basal insulin. Basal insulin refers to background insulin – it helps to control your liver’s output of stored glucose and is the insulin your body uses to control blood glucose levels when you are not eating. If the dose is set correctly, most people should be able to inject their basal insulin dose (syringe, pen or pump) and be able to not eat for 24 hours without their blood glucose level rising or falling more than approximately 30-40mg/dl. If your basal dose is correct, then you have flexibility in the timing of your meals because your basal insulin dose will keep you steady in between the meals you eat, whenever you choose to eat them. Flexibility is key!   

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Except in the cases of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) or perhaps intensive exercise, insulin is required to cover the carbohydrate that you eat. The dosage of insulin required for carbohydrate coverage will vary depending on the amount and possibly type of carbohydrate eaten, as well as the individual’s specific insulin needs for carbohydrate. Rapid acting insulin (Apidra, Humalog or Novolog) is usually the insulin of choice for carbohydrate coverage because of its rapid onset of action and 4 hour (typically) duration of action. Many people who match insulin to the carbohydrate that they eat have been given a carbohydrate ratio to use. A carbohydrate ratio states how many grams of carbohydrate are covered by 1 unit of rapid acting insulin. Some people may require a different carbohydrate ratio for the various meals of the day or for certain tricky foods, such as sushi, chinese food and high fat foods. Everybody is unique!        

6.   Monitoring your blood glucose levels is key!
Diabetes cannot be managed successfully by using the ‘How you feel method’ – unfortunately the glucose thermostat is just not that sensitive or specific enough. Blood glucose monitoring is essential. For instance, fasting and pre-meal blood glucose values can give you important information regarding your basal insulin doses and 2 hour post prandial (post meal) blood glucose values can give you valuable data regarding meal coverage. It is very important not to constantly react to specific blood glucose values because you risk a reactive management style. You are best to look for patterns in the blood glucose information and make informed insulin changes based on patterns that you see. This is the key advantage of continuous glucose monitors – pattern recognition. Just like the story of the tortoise and the hare – you will get faster to your desired blood glucose destination by taking a proactive and informed approach rather than a rapid and reactive approach.  The tortoise always wins!    

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